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Entire USA Shaking from Ecuador Quake; all Seismographs STILL Quivering Hours Later!

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UPDATE:4/17/2016

BREAKING NEWS-Entire USA Shaking from Ecuador Quake; all Seismographs STILL Quivering Hours Later!

A Volcanic Vent opened beneath the Shoshone River outside the Yellowstone super volcano at the same time the US Geological Survey and Utah Seismic Center were specifically denying trouble brewing at Yellowstone as the reason for seismic data being taken offline last week.

Photos below show the fissure open underwater with such heat coming out, it caused the river to give off steam!

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A small hydrothermal feature spouted to life March 25 in the Shoshone River where it meanders through Cody, Wyo. — just east of Yellowstone National Park’s more famous geyser features — spewing a brew of heated gases into the water for about four days.

READThe Last News About Supervolcano Yellowstone : Scientists warning over SUPERVOLCANO that could kill MILLIONS.Yellowstone about to blow?

“I was surprised to see it,” said Dewey Vanderhoff, a Cody photographer who captured shots of the venting. “I’ve lived here all of my life and I’ve never seen it.”

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Hot past

The Cody region was once called Colter’s Hell in memory of early explorer and trapper John Colter. He visited the region in the early 1800s after finishing a cross-country trek with two guys named Lewis and Clark. Colter noted the Cody-area geysers, hot springs and sulfurous smelling river and he told others. Back then the Shoshone River was known as the Stinkingwater or Stinking river for its sulfurous smell.

Over the ages, most of those hydrothermal features have subsided, although geyser cones, hot springs, sinkholes, a sulfur-permeated spring and an abandoned sulfur mine and mill still stand testament to the area’s more active past.

“We’re kind of in a lull compared to when John Colter was in this area,” said Jason Burkhardt, a Cody-based fisheries biologist for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. “There was substantially more geothermal activity that was occurring back then.”

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